THOMAS E. OSBORNE, D.D.S.
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

770-723-9965     2295 Parklake Drive NE •  Suite 240Atlanta, GA 30345

              Dental Implants

Call Us Today for an Appointment:
770-723-9965


Email Us:
info@teosborneoralsurgery.com


Office Address:
2295 Parklake Dr. NE
Suite 240
Atlanta, GA 30345


Click here to view our HIPAA Notification of Privacy Policies

Dental implants are metal anchors placed in the jaw bone underneath the gum tissue to support artificial teeth where natural teeth are missing. Unlike other types of tooth replacements, such as removable dentures or fixed bridges that are cemented to remaining teeth , dental implants are actually placed ("implanted") into the jaw bone under the gum tissue. These implants are usually made from a space-age metal called titanium, which is readily accepted by the body, and artificial teeth that look like natural teeth are then attached to the implants. Accepted by the American Dental Association, dental implants have been used for many years, and hundreds of thousands have been placed. Due to a phenomenon known as "osteointegration," meaning that bone actually attaches itself to the implant, these anchors provide a strong foundation that allows people with missing teeth to chew efficiently and comfortably.

Statistics show that 69% of adults ages 35 to 44 have lost at least one permanent tooth to an accident, gum disease, a failed root canal or tooth decay. Furthermore, by age 74, 26% of adults have lost all of their permanent teeth. Twenty years ago, these patients would have had no alternative but to employ a fixed bridge or removable denture to restore their ability to eat, speak clearly and smile.

Fixed bridges and removable dentures, however, are not the perfect solution and often bring with them a number of other problems. Removable dentures may slip or cause embarrassing clicking sounds while eating or speaking. Of even greater concern, fixed bridges often affect adjacent healthy teeth, and removable dentures may lead to bone loss in the area where the tooth or teeth are missing. Recurrent decay, periodontal (gum) disease and other factors often doom fixed bridgework to early failure. For these reasons, fixed bridges and removable dentures usually need to be replaced every seven to 15 years.

Today there is another option for patients who are missing permanent teeth. Rather than resting on the gum line like removable dentures, or using adjacent teeth as anchors like fixed bridges, dental implants are long-term replacements that your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon surgically places in the jawbone. Composed of titanium metal that “fuses” with the jawbone through a process called “osseointegration,” dental implants never slip or make embarrassing noises that advertise the fact that you have “false teeth,” and never decay like teeth anchoring fixed bridges.

Because dental implants fuse with the jawbone, bone loss is generally not a problem. After more than 20 years of service, the vast majority of dental implants first placed by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons in the United States continue to still function at peak performance. More important, the recipients of those early dental implants are still satisfied they made the right choice. If properly cared for, dental implants can last a lifetime.

A dental implant designed to replace a single tooth is composed of three parts: the titanium implant that fuses with the jawbone; the abutment, which fits over the portion of the implant that protrudes from the gum line; and the crown, which is created by a prosthodontist or restorative dentist and fitted onto the abutment for a natural appearance. Many people who are missing a single tooth opt for a fixed bridge; but a bridge may require the cutting down of healthy, adjacent teeth that may or may not need to be restored in the future. Then there is the additional cost of possibly having to replace the bridge once, twice or more over the course of a lifetime. Similarly, a removable partial denture may contribute to the loss of adjacent teeth. Studies show that within five to seven years there is a failure rate of up to 30% in teeth located next to a fixed bridge or removable partial denture.

 

Portions of the information on this page has been reprinted with permission

Website Builder